According to historian Sonia M. Zaide, the agreement consisted of three parts: According to General Emilio Aguinaldo, who wrote in 1899, the main terms of the Biak-na-Bato Pact were: [4] The separation of the Philippines from the Spanish monarchy and its formation into an independent state with a separate government called the Philippine Republic was the end of the revolution in the Philippine Republic. The terms of the Biak-na-Bato pact saw the payment of 800,000 pesos to Aguinaldo and other leaders of the revolution in exchange for their voluntary exile in Hong Kong, the payment of 900,000 pesos by Spain for the damage caused to civilians during their colonization of the country, the imposition and surrender of weapons by revolutionaries, a general amnesty for all and an oral promise of reform. Paterno`s efforts led to a peace agreement called the Biak-na-Bato Pact. These were three documents, the first two of which were published on 14 December 1897 and the third on 15 December 1897. ==External links== to end the Republic of Biak-na-Bato. According to General Emilio Aguinaldo, who wrote in 1899, the main terms of the Biak-na-Bato Pact were: [4] On August 9, 1897, Paterno proposed a peace based on Aguinaldo`s reforms and amnesty. Over the next few months, Paterno went back and forth between Manila and Biak-na-Bato with proposals and counter-proposals. Paterno`s efforts led to a peace agreement, the so-called Biak na Bato Pact.

These are three documents, the first two of which were signed on 14 December 1897 and the third on 15 December; Republic of Biak-na-Bato. [10] We revolutionaries fulfilled our obligation to surrender our weapons, which were known to be more than 1,000, after they were published in the Manila newspapers. But the captain, General Primo de Rivera, did not respect the agreement as faithfully as we did. The other payments were never paid; the brothers were not limited in their acts of tyranny and oppression, neither to expel them, nor to secularize religious orders; The requested reforms were not inaugurated, although the Te Deumwas were sung. This non-compliance by the Spanish authorities with the terms of the treaty caused me and my companions a great deal of misery, which quickly turned into irritation when I received a letter from Lieutenant-Colonel Don Miguel Primo de Rivera (nephew and private secretary of the aforementioned General) telling me that I and my companions could never return to Manila. The separation of the Philippines from the Spanish monarchy and its formation into an independent state with its own government, the Republic of the Philippines, marked the end of the revolution in the existing war, which took place on September 24. Beginning of August 1896; For this reason, we, the representatives of the revolution, on its behalf and by the power of the Filipino people, who faithfully interpret their wishes and ambitions, unanimously adopted the following articles of the State Constitution at a meeting in Biac-na-bato on November 1, 1897. In accordance with the first part of the pact, Aguinaldo and twenty-five other senior leaders of the revolution were exiled to Hong Kong with $MXN 400,000[a] in their possession. [10] The rest of the men received $MXN 200,000[a], but the third instalment was never received. The general amnesty was never declared because sporadic skirmishes continued. [11] According to General Emilio Aguinaldo, who wrote in 1899, the main terms of the Biak-na-bato Pact were:[4] [9] A charter based on the Cuban Constitution was also drafted by Felix Ferrer and Isabelo Artacho.

Signed on November 18, 1897. The Constitution of Biak-na-Bato provided for the establishment of a Supreme Council to serve as the supreme organ of the government of the Republic. He also described some basic human rights such as freedom of religion, freedom of the press and the right to education. Emilio Aguinaldo and Mariano Trias were each elected Chairman of the Board of Governors and Vice-Presidents. The Biak-na-Bato Pact Pedro Paterno, a Filipino-born Spaniard, volunteered to negotiate between Aguinaldo and Governor Primo de Rivera to end the clashes. Paterno`s efforts bore fruit when he signed the pact on December 15, 1897, representing the revolutionaries and Rivera representing the Spanish government. The Heads of State and Government are: Emilio Aguinaldo President, Mariano Trias Vice-President, Antonio Montenegro Secretary, Baldomero Aguinaldo Treasurer and Emilio Riego de Dios. On the 23rd. In December 1897, Generals Celestino Tejero and Ricardo Monet of the Spanish army arrived in Biak-na-Bato and became hostages of the rebels.

The Pact of Biak-na-Bato, signed on December 14, 1897, created an armistice between the Spanish government and the Philippine revolutionary government under the leadership of Emilio Aguinaldo to end the Philippine Revolution. The pact included the signing of three documents: a programme, an act of understanding and a financial provision. Pedro Paterno represented the revolutionaries and Governor Primo de Rivera represented the Spanish government at the signing of the pact. According to historian Teodoro Agoncillo, the pact consisted of three documents, collectively known as the Armistice of Biak-na-BatΓ³, which provided, among other things:[8] However, some Filipino generals did not believe in the sincerity of the Spaniards. They refused to surrender their weapons. But the Te Deum was sung on January 23, 1898. The biak na-bato pact, we revolutionaries have fulfilled our obligation to surrender our weapons, which, as everyone knows, exceed a thousand since they were published in the newspapers of Manila. But the captain, General Primo de Rivera, did not respect the agreement as faithfully as we did. The other payments were never paid; the brothers were not limited in their acts of tyranny and oppression, neither to expel them, nor to secularize religious orders; The requested reforms were not inaugurated, although the Te Deumwas were sung.

This non-compliance by the Spanish authorities with the terms of the treaty caused me and my companions a great deal of misery, which quickly turned into irritation when I received a letter from Lieutenant-Colonel Don Miguel Primo de Rivera (nephew and private secretary of the aforementioned General) telling me that I and my companions could never return to Manila. On November 18, 1897, Aguinaldo and several revolutionaries convened a citizens` assembly to draft an interim constitution for the Philippines, now known as the Biak na Bato Constitution. The government was to be governed by a Supreme Council composed of a president, a vice-president and four secretaries authorized to govern. However, this plan never materialized, as Aguinaldo had begun negotiations with the Spanish government. The result was an agreement under which Filipino revolutionaries would go into exile in Hong Kong and surrender their weapons in exchange for financial compensation and pardons. The Biak-na-Bato Pact, as it was later called, was signed on December 15, 1897. After the pact was signed, Spanish generals Celestino Tejero and Ricardo Monet were handed over as hostages to the Philippine leaders. On December 27, 1897, Aguinaldo and 25 other leaders of the revolution left the Philippines to go into voluntary exile in Hong Kong. Spain deposited the first check for 400,000 pesos at the Bank of Hong Kong, but Aguinaldo refused to share the amount among his supporters, and himself, with the idea of keeping the money for the purchase of weapons and ammunition, should continue the fight if Spain did not respect its end of the pact. On the 31st.

In December 1897, some Filipinos began to surrender their weapons, although some still refused. A charter based on the Cuban constitution was also drafted by Felix Ferrer and Isabelo Artacho. It was signed on November 1, 1897. The Constitution of Biak-na-Bato provided for the establishment of a Supreme Council to serve as the supreme governing body of the republic. He also highlighted some fundamental human rights such as freedom of religion, freedom of the press and the right to education. Emilio Aguinaldo and Mariano Trias were elected Chairmen of the Board of Governors and Vice-Chairmen respectively. The Pact of Biak-na-Bato Pedro Paterno, a Spaniard born in the Philippines, volunteered to act as a negotiator between Aguinaldo and Governor Primo de Rivera to end the clashes. Paterno`s efforts paid off when he was released on 15 September.

He signed the pact in December 1897 when he signed the pact as a representative of the revolutionaries and Rivera as a representative of the Spanish government. The leaders are: Emilio Aguinaldo President, Mariano Trias Vice-President, Antonio Montenegro Secretary, Baldomero Aguinaldo Treasurer and Emilio Riego de Dios. On December 23, 1897, Generals Celestino Tejero and Ricardo Monet of the Spanish army arrived in Biak-na-Bato and became hostages of the rebels. A ceasefire was declared by both sides and an agreement was reached between Aguinaldo and the Spanish armed forces – that the Spanish government will grant autonomy to the Philippines in 3 years if Aguinaldo goes into exile and surrenders his weapons. In return, Aguinaldo received 800,000 Mexican pesos in compensation for the revolutionaries and an amnesty. After receiving a partial payment of 400,000 pesos, Aguinaldo left for Hong Kong on December 27, 1897. However, some Filipino generals did not believe in the sincerity of the Spaniards. They refused to surrender their weapons. Nevertheless, the Te Deum was still sung on January 23, 1898. The Biak-na-Bato Pact fails The pact was signed in San Miguel, Bulacan, at the home of Pablo Tecson, a Filipino revolutionary captain who served as a brigadier general in General Gregorio del Pilar`s “Brigada Del Pilar” (military force) during the revolution.

In return, Aguinaldo received 800,000 Mexican pesos in compensation for the revolutionaries and an amnesty. After receiving a partial payment of 400,000 pesos, Aguinaldo left for Hong Kong on December 27, 1897. .

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